LGBTIQA+ Greens https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/ Proud of our diversity. Promoted by Chris Williams on behalf of The Green Party, both at PO Box 78066, London SE16 9GQ. Thu, 21 Dec 2023 00:27:48 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.5.3 https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2023/08/cropped-LOGO-Transparent-Dark-1-32x32.png LGBTIQA+ Greens https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/ 32 32 LGBTIQA+ Greens response to the proposed Trans School Guidance – by Cade Hatton & Ria Patel https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/2023/12/19/lgbtiqa-greens-response-to-the-proposed-trans-school-guidance-by-cade-hatton-ria-patel/ Tue, 19 Dec 2023 18:59:19 +0000 https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/?p=3327 We have another Section 28 starting. Sadly, most LGBTIQA+ people in the UK are aware of Section 28. It was introduced in 1988 by Margaret Thatcher and wasn’t repealed until 2003 in England and Wales. This series of laws essentially outlawed any discussion of sexuality or gender outside of a heterosexual, cisgender ‘norm’ especially within [...]

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We have another Section 28 starting. Sadly, most LGBTIQA+ people in the UK are aware of Section 28. It was introduced in 1988 by Margaret Thatcher and wasn’t repealed until 2003 in England and Wales. This series of laws essentially outlawed any discussion of sexuality or gender outside of a heterosexual, cisgender ‘norm’ especially within schools.

This led to years of young LGBTIQA+ people - and their teachers - having to hide who they were. Imagine not only being made to feel shame for a core part of who you are but also fearing breaking the law if you even spoke about being different. 

Although it is up to schools to adopt, the government is trying to create a harmful standard with this guidance. The proposed Trangender Guidance for Schools, which is out for consultation, would see teachers ignoring their students - misgendering them, deadnaming them, and outing them to their parents. It states that “There is no general duty to allow a child to ‘social transition’” and that Gender Identity ‘is a contested belief’. It suggests a period of 'watchful waiting'. It claims that social transition isn’t a neutral act. It isn’t necessarily. But neither is being raised to follow a cis-normative gender. It places greater emphasis on the importance of the parent’s views and impact on the school community, without any mention of the benefits of transition for a trans young person.

The guidance states that it would be very rare for a child to be at risk of significant harm following the school informing parents or guardians about the student questioning their gender. Evidence does not show this. Trans youth are already at an incredibly high risk of homelessness, violence, and depression - the proposals we’ve seen so far would only see that worsen. This is another Section 28 - it would see a generation of trans youth mistreated and ignored.

On top of all of this, the government confirmed that they did not consult with a single LGBT+ organisation this year - during the key times they were drafting this guidance. Not only does this show a wilful disregard for the lived experiences of trans people, it is also the latest example in a list of dangerous ignorance. Disabled people, members of the global majority, refugees and women have all been thrown under the bus by this government and we must stand together against this dangerous right-wing Conservative ideology, which has been amplified by the mainstream media.

This guidance is now open for consultation until March 12th 2024 if you feel inclined to respond. There should be no room for bigotry within our schools. They should all be a safe space for all children.

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For Trans Day of Remembrance – “We are a Community, and no one Should be Alone” written by Cade Hatton https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/2023/11/19/for-trans-day-of-remembrance-we-are-a-community-and-no-one-should-be-alone-written-by-cade-hatton/ Sun, 19 Nov 2023 22:12:58 +0000 https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/?p=3321 On November 12th, 2014, I nearly became a name on the list- the list of trans people killed in the last year, the core of Transgender Day of Remembrance - read out eight days later. Sometimes I wonder what the world would look like if I had - would it be different? I certainly hope [...]

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On November 12th, 2014, I nearly became a name on the list- the list of trans people killed in the last year, the core of Transgender Day of Remembrance - read out eight days later. Sometimes I wonder what the world would look like if I had - would it be different? I certainly hope so- I hope my life has made a difference in the nearly ten years since. 

 

I’d only been out for a year or two then, and I’d not even approached my doctor to be referred anywhere. Back then, I lived in Wales, at uni, and at the time you had to be referred to a psychiatrist before being referred to Charing Cross GIC - a journey that would have taken something like 8 hours one way. I couldn’t even fathom going through all that, knowing that the waiting times for all of it would have seen me back home long before I got my first appointment- which I did finally have in Nottingham in early 2020. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

 

The first person I came out to was my best friend, when we were 17. She passed away not long after, and in dealing with my grief I shoved myself back into that closet. It took going to uni, meeting people who knew what my first forays into ‘I’m not a girl, but I’m not a boy’ might mean. I was 19 when I first learned the term non-binary. 

 

I was 20 when my life felt too much to bear. A series of things had happened- as they always do. My girlfriend and I had broken up. My childhood pet rabbit and the hamster I had at uni passed away. I felt alone, and completely isolated, because there were things about me that were wrong and I felt so inescapably lonely in that. Some people used the pronouns I begged them to - most didn’t. I was constantly reminded of the fact that my name back then, Kaii, wasn’t the name I’d registered at uni with because my dad thought that it was a fad. He wasn’t right in the end- I used Kaii for over ten years - and I regret listening to him then.

 

I wonder if I’d come out to everyone when I came out to Clare - using clunky language that I couldn’t explain properly and she didn’t understand - whether that night would have happened, whether my mum’s frantic drive across the country would have happened or whether we would have met up the next week like we’d planned. I wonder if my discomfort with being ‘one of the girls’ had been noticed earlier, maybe I would have been referred as a kid (and now be one of the transphobic statistics on child mutilation). 

 

Whatever would have happened, I won’t ever know. We only get this one go - this one life, and we can change ourselves and what we do going forward but we can’t change who we were, what we did. That’s part of why I didn’t try to hide who I was when I started being active in the party again. I could have - as far as I know, 3 people remember me well from back then - but Kaii was a part of me who mattered just as much as Cade does now. 

 

I’m glad Kaii wasn’t on that list in 2014. I’m sad at how many names were on that list, and sadder still at how many there are this year. I know that now, just as nine years ago, just as twenty four years ago, the list isn’t as long as it would be if we actually knew all the closeted trans kids (and adults) who couldn’t bear the weight of their secrets- and maybe if no one had to bear that weight, the list wouldn’t exist at all.

 

So today, on this Trans Day of Remembrance, I’m saying loud and clear- I’ll share that weight. If you are looking at this year's list thinking you’ll be on next year’s, I will listen to you and I will help you carry whatever burdens sit on your shoulders. We are a community, and no one should be alone.

Written by Cade Hatton

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A Reflection on Trans Remembrance https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/2023/11/15/a-reflection-on-trans-remembrance/ Wed, 15 Nov 2023 18:16:32 +0000 https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/?p=3315 Article By Mina Cousins Earlier this year, a girl from Warrington was violently killed by two people, in a way that can very much be considered a hate crime. That girl's name is Brianna Ghey (https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/uk-news/2023/feb/15/brianna-ghey-two-teenagers-charged-murder). She was trans, and it's believed that was in part a motivating factor in her being killed. She is [...]

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A candle glowing warmly in a dark background

Article By Mina Cousins

Earlier this year, a girl from Warrington was violently killed by two people, in a way that can very much be considered a hate crime. That girl's name is Brianna Ghey (https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/uk-news/2023/feb/15/brianna-ghey-two-teenagers-charged-murder).

She was trans, and it's believed that was in part a motivating factor in her being killed. She is considered the first known trans person in England to be murdered in over a decade. Following from this, violent attacks against trans people, and other LGBTIQA+ people in general, have happened throughout the year, from an arson attack on two trans women and a gay man[i], to stabbings in Clapham[ii] and attacks on queer businesses in Manchester[iii], not to mention the ongoing intimidating protests and violence from fascists towards gender nonconforming people and Drag Queen Story Times[iv].

 

Brianna, as she didn't have a Gender Recognition Certificate, is buried officially under her deadname, as in her death certificate has her deadname on it and is written with male pronouns like 'he' and 'him'. There was a petition to change this, at the very least for her, but the government declined. The Times, a right wing newspaper increasingly known for its transphobic output, even used her deadname a few days after her murder. The news of her murder was reported internationally, our government and main opposition party, often quick to comment on news like this, were silent. In the months following, our government and main opposition party have contributed even more to the demonisation of trans people, which has led to an increase in anti-LGBTIQA+ violence across the UK. Part of me wished, desperately, that her murder would bring about a pause, a silencing of transphobes to make them realise what they were doing. This didn't happen.

 

The number globally for trans people killed is 392[v].

This figure only paints part of what's happening: it doesn't account for those in an abusive household- forced to detransition or worse.

It can never take full account of those who committed suicide, from losing all faith in transitioning because of being denied healthcare to intense harrassment and bullying. I write this article, actually, when a trans kid (14 years old) committed suicide because of harrassment, as well as hearing of a trans woman in Manchester doing the same. On the former, his mother posted about this online, and became the subject of harassment herself. 

 

This is Britain today. It's not the fault, as many transphobes like to claim, of 'radical members of the trans community' (unless radical is wanting better healthcare), in the same way misogyny is not the fault of 'noisy feminists'.

It can be worse though. Without wanting to reduce trans people in places like Florida to an oblique warning, the effective ban on transness in states like that are meant to reduce the population of trans people to zero. It is terrifying then that our government has been having conversations about this with the Governor of Florida.

It's striking on one level that we are in this state- only 6 years ago was the promise of reform to the Gender Recognition Act and a full ban on conversion therapy on the agenda of a Conservative government. Not that everything was perfect in 2017- far from it- for most people, but the shift since 2020 towards engaging in (rather than just benefiting from) culture wars, from race to gender to the climate, is terrifying.

As well, we have a Labour party complicit with this culture war, unwilling, not unable, to challenge this. Willing, then, to allow for the continued oppression of all marginalised groups in order to win a few hundred more votes.

 

I remember, when helping promote LGBTIQA+ candidates this year, a few times being asked by some trans candidates for local elections to ensure they weren't called a 'trans candidate', but rather an 'LGBTIQA+ candidate'. In some cases too, this was without any prompting- I hadn't even mentioned the word 'trans' aside from the acronym.

What this says is that it is incredibly hard and difficult to be trans and run for elected office, not entirely because of electability, but because of the threat to safety. It isn't safe to be a trans person existing in Britain, let alone being an election candidate.

 

More needs to be done to address the safety of trans and all LGBTIQA+ people in public, daily life, yet this is something regarded as 'woke' (used in the pejorative) by the Home Secretary.

It is important to remember joy. There was joy, for instance, earlier this year at Trans Pride in London. It was also my first ever Pride, coincidentally. There was pride, joy and a sense of belonging. LGBTIQA+ Greens were also the only major political party LGBT+ group to actually attend.

As well this year, we saw more trans and non-binary people elected as councillors, including people elected as Green councillors.

Considering you're reading this article, I presume you agree you find all this as amazing as I do, and the political weight Trans Pride has is not to be downplayed. But on its own, joy and ideals don't achieve liberation, or even a slightly more tolerable world long term. It's one of the reasons, besides the fact that everyone who died who is trans deserves to be remembered (because they may not have someone to remember them), why Trans Day of Remembrance is important: to remind you of what we are fighting to stop. To stop another forced detransition, another suicide, another murder. 

Instead, trans people need a world that supports their need to transition and can provide the healthcare to do that. We can only have that in a world of social and climate justice, that's why LGBTIQA+ liberation and climate justice go hand in hand.

We must never, ever stop in our campaign for a safer, better world- a liberated world- and we must continue this cause, always.

—------------------

Notes:

[i] https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/london-fire-brigade-police-transphobia-lgbtq-whitechapel-flat-arson-b1075478.html

[ii] https://www.google.com/amp/s/news.sky.com/story/amp/two-men-stabbed-in-homophobic-attack-in-clapham-high-street-12939793

[iii] https://www.thepinknews.com/2023/09/13/gay-adult-shop-manchester-attacked/

[iv]https://www.thepinknews.com/2023/03/10/bournemouth-drag-queens-homophobic-attack/

[v] https://tdor.translivesmatter.info/reports?from=2022-10-01&to=2023-09-30&country=all&category=all&view=list&filter=

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Dogwhistle Guidance https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/2023/06/15/dogwhistle-guidance/ Thu, 15 Jun 2023 16:26:57 +0000 https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/?p=3272 How to Spot and Disarm a Dogwhistle Content Warning: racism, antisemitism, misogyny, transphobia, queerphobia, mentions of paedophillia, suicide, mental health, abuse. This document seeks to be a shorthand reference for when encountering transphobic and queerphobic dogwhistles, and how to identify them and engage with them. In this context, ‘disarm’ refers to removing the power to [...]

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How to Spot and Disarm a Dogwhistle

Content Warning: racism, antisemitism, misogyny, transphobia, queerphobia, mentions of paedophillia, suicide, mental health, abuse.

This document seeks to be a shorthand reference for when encountering transphobic and queerphobic dogwhistles, and how to identify them and engage with them. In this context, ‘disarm’ refers to removing the power to hurt.

The document is broken down into 4 parts:

  1. definitions
  2. what is a dogwhistle,
  3. examples of transphobic and queerphobic dogwhistles and how to engage,
  4. and a recap.

1: Definitions

Transgender/Trans: To align/identifies with a gender (or non) that you were not assigned to at birth. This applies to non-binary people.

 

Cis: the opposite of trans; to identify with the gender you were assigned as.

 

Trans woman: someone assigned male at birth who identifies as a woman.

 

Trans man: someone assigned female at birth who identifies as a man.

 

Non-Binary/Enby: someone who's gender does not align with the binary conception of gender as 'man and woman'.

 

Transphobia: the hatred, irrational fear, aversion or dislike of, or discrimination of a transgender or non-binary person on account of their gender, of trans and non-binary people. Transphobia is both systemic and non-systemic, as are many other bigotries.

 

Gender Critical: someone who believes that sex is the only factor to consider regarding if someone is a man or woman, not gender. Many Gender Critical people do not believe enbies are actually enby. The term Gender Critical is often used by transphobes to disguise their bigotry as merely ‘sex essentialism’, not unlike those who use the term ‘Race Realist’ to disguise their racism.

 

Conversion Therapy: the process of using intrusive (physically and/or mentally) procedures to 'convert' someone from being LGB to Straight, or in making someone trans into cis.

 

Detransition: when someone who was trans, for whatever reason(s) decides to stop their transition.

 

AGAB: Assigned Gender at Birth. This can be male (AMAB) or female (AFAB).

 

2: What is a Dogwhistle?

Simply put a ‘dogwhistle’ is a subtle way of communicating political points which, initially, can only be understood by the demographic it’s aimed towards, and by the demographic the political point is about.

Examples are helpful to demonstrate this. One of the most famous examples would be that of ‘states’ rights’ when used by conservative Southern US politicians. Here, ‘states’ rights’ is aimed towards white Southern US voters, and ‘states’ rights’ is about black people (or more specifically, the Southern US’s right on a state level to treat black people as non-citizens). This phrase of ‘states’ rights’, which has a history going back to the start of the USA, but was popularised during the 1960s and 70s in the aftermath of desegregation and the Black Civil Rights movement, is charged with meaning, even if strictly speaking it’s a phrase regarding a federal constitution. Phrases have meaning which are contextual: the federal government was seen as a threat to the state’s right to segregate people on the basis of race. So ‘states’ rights’ became a way of communicating one's opposition to the federal or progressive forces, without saying out loud ‘I support the segregation of races’.

Indeed, the subtlety is the point. Enoch Powell’s ‘Rivers of Blood’ Speech, for instance, isn’t subtle; it was blatantly racist when it was first delivered in the 60s. However, the Conservative Party policy on immigration at the time was subtle. It was the explicitness and tone of Powell that got him fired from the Conservative frontbench, not the content of what he said. Therefore, subtlety is used to avoid accusations of bigotry and hate in bad faith by seeming to replace the actual topic with a more abstract tone, like ‘states rights’.

Thankfully, dogwhistles can be rendered ineffective by sharing understanding and raising awareness. ‘States’ Rights’ has become so synonymous with what it meant to hide that using the term is often challenged, and even acknowledged publicly by conservatives. As well, awareness of the phrase’s meaning became more widespread after a book which had an interview with Republican strategist Lee Atwater had Atwater explaining what States' Rights meant. While no one writing this is thankfully Atwater, it is hoped that this explanation of what various dogwhistles mean helps allies who are now unaware of that, and how to challenge them.

3: A List of Commonly Used Transphobic and Queerphobic Dogwhistles.

 

Below are some commonly used transphobic dogwhistles. You'll find out what they actually mean and how you can disarm them.

 

  • 'The Trans/Gay Agenda'

 

What it means: 'Trans Agenda' is the attempt to suggest that transitioning (especially medically transitioning), trans awareness and trans equality are all being pushed by ominous figures in the 'Establishment'. The 'Establishment' here includes 'big pharma (major multinational pharmaceutical companies collectively as a sector of industry.)' and 'globalists' (a rightist term describe 'unpatriotic' capitalists), e.g George Soros (a Jewish Billionaire who often supports progressive leaning projects around the world), and often ties in with antisemitic tropes of Jewish plots to undermine white patriarchy.

 

How to disarm: Ask the person, if in a small group or 1-1, what evidence they have and who their sources are.

 

  • 'What about detransition rates?!'

 

What it means: Talk of detransition narratives and regret are often used to delegitimise the competency of those seeking or who have sought transition (mainly medical). This has also been used to justify trans exclusion from the Conversion Therapy ban, as if people need to be 'tested' (read: tortured) regarding their gender. As well, Bell v Tavistock news coverage often centred the regret of Kiera Bell as a way to suggest clinics were 'pushing' being trans.

 

How to disarm: Noting that there is no one reason for detransition, and that detransition rates are incredibly low, is helpful.Only around 0.4-2% of those who medically transition, detransition and considering the small size of the trans population, this is a very small number of people - the actual number is unknown due to poor data collection. Indeed, the main reason, for around a quarter of cases, for detransition is actually social pressure and societal resentment.

 

Special Note: Detrans people should not be pushed away by us and plenty of them are allies. Read this article for more information.

 

  • 'Biological Sex' & 'Sex Matters/ Sex Essentialism'

 

What it means: This is to effectively say that gender identity is irrelevant, and that sex is what defines what a 'man' or 'woman' is. Non-binary and gender diverse people (enbies) get put into one of these categories as a result. This is used often in discussions on sport, public toilets and also in pregnancy (often over trans men and assigned female at birth (AFAB) enbies). The term ‘sex matters’, that relates to the concept of ‘sex essntialism’, is used to justify a set of policies that takes the imagery of ‘common sense’ to a constructed mainstream audience (which is mostly white and middle class) which would lead to the policing of the bodies of all (cis and trans) woman by a misogynistic police force, and for all AFAB trans people a healthcare system that is even more humiliating than it already is. Then, sex essentialism is dangerous and hurts gender non-conforming people especially.

 

How to disarm: Pointing out that sex isn't a binary is part of disarming: intersex people exist, and people’s chromosomes aren’t always XX or XY - there’s also more to sex than chromosomes! As well, making it clear that gender identity and all its variations in time and place has a role too in the oppression non-cis men face. While genitals of course do play a role in how society 'genders' people from birth, and are part of how cis women (and AFAB people generally) are oppressed, the point gender criticals make downplays how gender expression plays a role in oppression, and how our cis-patriarchal, white supremacist society punishes those who don't conform to white cis masculinity.

 

  • References to the Trans Suicide Rate and mental health

 

What it means: Gender critical people use this argument to suggest trans people are 'mentally disturbed' and 'sick'; therefore, unable to have competency over defining what their gender, or lack thereof, is. Intersectionally, this is both transphobic and ableist.

 

How to disarm: When trans suicides occur, it's generally as a result of untreated mental illness and health issues that are a result of a transphobic society and unequal health service, or because of intense bullying campaigns.

 

  • 'Protecting Children'

 

What this means: This is about suggesting that trans and queer people generally are a threat to children's safety, implying paedophilia among a whole group.

 

How to disarm: Challenge the presumption by asking the person what they mean, and following that with asking what their evidence is can be helpful if you have the facts already about the rate at which this actually happens (which is negligable) and if it's among a small group or 1-1. If it's in a fast paced area, like a conference debate, using your point of information or inclusion card could be a good way to stop their flow and counter their dogwhistle.

 

  • 'Let kids be kids'

 

What it means: Kids are apparently being overloaded by ideas like 'gender' and 'sexuality' which is ‘transitioning’ them. This is nonsense. This links back to the idea of the 'trans/gay agenda' (1). It also links to the idea of ‘social cognition’- especially as kids are seen as more prone to ‘trends’ like queerness, as if being queer or trans is a fashion statement. As well there is the idea of forced transition, where an authority figure like parents are forcing their kids to be trans for clout. This is harmful rhetoric which endangers children, especially trans children and young people, which leads to a Section 28 style culture in education.

 

How to disarm: If this person generally sees themselves as progressive, ask them if they think being taught gayness existing at an early age is wrong. Otherwise, question why they think it's wrong. Why is it a safeguarding risk? Why is it intrinsically wrong to teach queerness? This should expose their ideas. As well, note that when something becomes more socially accepted, that thing increases in people identifying with it, from left handed writing to accepting they’re gay or bi. The same is happening with the wider queer identities now.

 

  • 'What is a woman?'

 

What it means: This question is usually asked in bad faith. The answer it demands from queer people is an answer that can easily be construed as 'big burly (cis) men with penises' in order to 'discredit' self ID as a safeguarding risk, similar to (5), by presenting the real threat of male violence as one of a fictional 'trans violence'. This is in spite of the evidence from countries like the Republic of Ireland.

 

How to disarm: Pointing out that the question is flawed in how it seeks to reduce women to their genitals can work, but can backfire by seeming to avoid the question. If you go for a self ID answer, know the facts: say with certainty that cis men abusing this doesn't actually happen.

 

  • Using 'they' to describe a trans woman/ trans man repeatedly

 

What it means: This can be a casualisation of pronouns to deny the gender identity of a trans man or trans woman by refusing to use he/him  /  she/her respectively.

 

How to disarm: In response, you're speaking about a particular trans person or persons, assert the right pronoun first and foremost in your speech.

 

  • 'Protecting Women'

 

What it means: Like (5), the suggestion is that queer people are inherently dangerous to women. At the moment, this applies more so with trans women and NBies who present femme. However, this dogwhistle has been used historically towards lesbians (particularly in the 1910s to 1930s and in the 1990s), and to this day also targets 'butch' and more masc presenting lesbians, cis or trans.

 

How to disarm: Pointing out that trans women/femme enbies are often the targets of violence and hate crime like cis women is important. Reframing the dogwhistle to be about how protecting not cis men from the violence cis men can produce can be useful.

 

  • 'Protecting Lesbians'

 

What it means: An attempt to divide our community, the dogwhistle of 'protecting lesbians', and relatedly 'protecting lesbians from being forced to have sex with trans femmes', is invoked to suggest the false inherent 'predatory nature' of trans women towards cis women, to suggest an individual with a penis can't be a woman, and that sexuality is dependent on genital preference.

 

How to disarm: The fact that the vast majority of lesbians actually don't feel threatened, on the contrary are supportive of, trans women should be noted. The idea that potentially penetrative sex for a queer person with a vagina invalidates their sexuality is an incredibly reductive view and also seeks to invalidate bi people as well as lesbians who have sex with people with penises. As well, the notion of 'protecting lesbians' from often straight individuals is infantilising.

 

  • 'Women's sports is being infiltrated'

 

What it means: Verges onto explicit at times, this dogwhistle is the call for trans femme exclusion from women's sports, and by extension trans masc exclusion from men's sports on the grounds of 'fairness' and/or 'safety'. This can force trans athletes into dysphoric situations and can lead to intense safeguarding issues for trans athletes.

 

How to disarm: It's a fact that recent 'sex based' qualification checks relying on testosterone levels have disqualified cis women of colour. Pointing out how these kinds of tests lead to results that are in practice racist is important.

 

  • 'Genital Preferences are obviously transphobic'

 

What it means: The idea here is to suggest trans people existing forces cis people of any sexuality, though usually lesbians (10), to 'accept' a 'genital preference' that is far from the wishes of the latter. Though genital preferences can be a thing, to say they're transphobic 100% of the time is not nuanced. The point transphobes are making is that trans people are unreasonable and forcing others to accommodate them sexually.

 

How to disarm: Argue that very few trans people actually think that, if any, and most are concerned about healthcare and hate crime. As well, reducing sexuality to genital preferences is a disservice to every queer person and our shared culture that is so much more than genitals.

 

  • Kink and Other Derogatory Sexual Implications

 

What it means: That trans identities are simply about sexual gratification and or fetishism, usually as in trans femme people are doing this as a sexual kink. This also applies to gender nonconforming people, and notably towards Drag Queens who are doing Drag Queen Story Times, which links back to point 5.

How to disarm: Pointing out that the pseudo psychology behind this theory is disproven and homophobic is helpful. As well, noting how this language is that of the far right is also effective.

 

  • ‘Real Man/Woman’ and ‘Biological Fact’

 

What it means: A common one that even people who are well meaning but not as knowledgeable will make by accident, the assertion of ‘real’ (read: cis) women or men is one used actively by Gender Critical people to assert that trans identities are not valid, and therefore by implication are not as deserving of rights and protections.

How to disarm: If a genuine mistake, correct them politely and explain what cis means and how it isn’t a slur. If deliberate, ask why they think that and if they could explain how sex works then, considering how it isn’t a clear binary, as well as noting that reducing womanhood to biology is in the face of lived experience and is potentially racist and ableist.

4: Recap

 

We hope this has been helpful. The key takeaways are:

  • Dogwhistles are meant to be subtle. They're meant to sound 'reasonable'.
  • Questioning the person to explain what they mean undercuts the effectiveness of dogwhistles.
  • Dogwhistles intersect with other bigotries.

 

As seen in later examples, dogwhistles can be used to fetishise trans and queer bodies, as well as to associate a 'negative hyper masculinity' to trans women and a gendered 'vulnerability' to certain queer cis women to 1) institute a manufactured binary division and 2) create a cishet temporarily socially acceptable version of queerness that relies on protection from cishet patriarchy. The fetishisation generally is to associate all trans and queer bodies with degeneracy, violation, and threat. This is something seeped into our culture (helped by basic understandings of gender and sexuality), from Hollywood films to satirical magazines.

 

The fact that transphobic and queerphobic dogwhistles often intersect with antisemitism and racism is not a coincidence. Especially today, anti trans narratives are used as the thin edge of racist and antisemitic ideas like the 'Great Replacement Theory' (a theory that white people are being 'displaced' and 'overtaken' by PoC at the direction of a 'powerful Jewish elite'), where transness is associated with 'weakening' white masculinity and encouraging straight interracial relationships. The 'theory' is inconsistent, but that's not the issue. Its purpose is justification for authoritarian social and economic policy, i.e fascism. Dogwhistles are ultimately the socially acceptable wedge of this ideology. Not everyone who uses a dogwhistle is a fascist but using them has normalised harmful ideas.

 

An important thing to remember is that dogwhistles can be used in ignorance. They're designed to be innocuous. That's why they're effective. The tone you use will depend on who you are speaking to. Nothing is worse in optics for our liberation than cis and/or het male allies engaging people aggressively, often cis women harmed by cis men but caught in the trans/queerphobic web: they live in an oppressive society and have had an oppressed experience. People are caught because they feel they have concerns which are legitimate. They aren't founded in reality. But aggressive counter assertion is counterproductive.

 

We hope this is helpful.

 

 

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Support Our Letter Writing Campaign to Ban Conversion Therapy https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/2023/06/05/letter-writing-campaign-conversion-therapy/ Mon, 05 Jun 2023 19:23:16 +0000 https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/?p=3264 by Josh, Cade & Dylan Letter Writing and Members Meeting 6pm-9pm, July 7th We and the rest of the LGBTIQA+ Greens Committee are inviting our members and supporters to write to their local MPs to encourage them to support a trans & ace inclusive ban on conversion therapy. Equalities minister Kemi Badenoch MP recently appeared [...]

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by Josh, Cade & Dylan

Letter Writing and Members Meeting 6pm-9pm, July 7th
Letter Writing and Members Meeting 6pm-9pm, July 7th

We and the rest of the LGBTIQA+ Greens Committee are inviting our members and supporters to write to their local MPs to encourage them to support a trans & ace inclusive ban on conversion therapy. Equalities minister Kemi Badenoch MP recently appeared in front of a select committee and said the ban would arrive in “due course”. We’ve already been waiting since 2018- and the Government missed their own deadline of Spring 2022.

 

In the past, we’ve supported a petition on this ban, and we want to continue that work, ensuring our voices are clear in calling for a full trans & ace inclusive ban on conversion therapy. Writing to MPs across the country directly will enable us to continue that work and show we’re not going to allow such delays on this much needed legislation.

 

It is clear the Government don’t see this as a priority- all these delays and revisions to plans are tactics, as we’ve already gone through multiple consultations. It is essential that pressure remains on MP’s, on all sides to push forward with a ban this Parliament.

 

By writing to your Member of Parliament, you can help keep the ball rolling to finally ban conversion therapy in the UK.

 

Every day that conversion therapy continues to be legal in this country, more LGBTIQA+ people in this country are failed by their government. Across the world, bans on these practices already exist. Writing to your MP means that they know their constituents want to keep the pressure on the Government, and reminds the Government as a community we won’t stop until this ban happens.

 

You can find your local MP here.

 

And if you don’t have much experience writing letters to your MP, you can find a template BELOW. We’ll also be holding a social & letter writing session soon.

Details to join the members meeting to follow...

EMAIL TEMPLATE:

Dear [MP NAME],

 

I am writing to you as a constituent who wants to encourage you to continue to pressure the Government to enact a trans inclusive ban on conversion therapy. Theresa May as Prime Minister first introduced these plans in 2018, since then we have had 4 equalities ministers come and go. Now we have Kemi Badenoch, whose record on LGBTIQA+ rights are lacklustre. As such, many in the LGBTIQA+ community are concerned about how meaningful the current Government’s promises are.

 

After a series of U-turns on the exact nature of the ban and at one point an attempt to drop the whole effort, it is now clear the Government is pursuing a distract and delay tactic rather than enact any ban. The pretence of wanting legislation to be robust is simply laughable considering this government’s record on LGBTIQA+ rights.

 

Therefore, I write to you to encourage you to commit to pushing the Government to pick up the pace on this issue. Research indicates those who undergo conversion practices are 75% more likely to take their own lives according to the charity Mind and scientific evidence is clear. Not only that conversion therapy simply doesn’t work, but that it poses a substantial risk in producing further harms such as anxiety, depression, and other problems to those who undergo conversion therapy.

 

NHS England and the British Psychological Study are clear that the ban on conversion therapy must be inclusive of trans people. It is unacceptable to endorse this pseudoscientific practice in any way. 

 

Every year many people undergo this practice, a substantial number of them coerced into such practices. Often run by religious institutions without any medical knowledge it poses a substantial risk to the LGBTIQA+ community. The Government’s dithering is a passive endorsement of the harms conversion therapy are known to cause.

 

As a constituent I would appreciate a response detailing concrete and clear steps on how you plan to advocate for a ban on conversion therapy. 5 years is far too long, and the Government must set a date for the legislation to be announced. False promises around the “robust” nature from the equalities minister are simply unacceptable and demonstrate a type of dishonest politics.

 

I look forward to your response.

 

Kind regards,

[YOUR NAME]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Logical End of Corporate Pride and Where We Are, by Seb Cousins https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/2023/06/01/thelogicalendofcorporatepride/ Thu, 01 Jun 2023 14:58:55 +0000 https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/?p=3256 People at a Pride in Surrey event with "Trans Rights are Human Rights" placards and trans flags Love is love when kids are shamed to their peers and outed to their parents. One love together while queer people and businesses see rises in hate crimes. Pride for all except those LGBTIQA+ people in countries and [...]

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People at a Pride in Surrey event with "Trans Rights are Human Rights" placards and trans flags
People at a Pride in Surrey event with "Trans Rights are Human Rights" placards and trans flags

Love is love when kids are shamed to their peers and outed to their parents.

One love together while queer people and businesses see rises in hate crimes.

Pride for all except those LGBTIQA+ people in countries and camps and on boats, forced out of their countries by wars and laws and Britain decides they should be allowed to die.

 

We live in times of a resurged, pulsating queerphobic repression, which ties with a renewed backlash against the calls for black and women's liberation.

 

What is corporate, mainstream Pride to those who are denied good housing, are in abusive situations, or have a disability that impacts their comprehension, their creativity, their place in an increasingly online community?

A distant glimmer of hope? Of what their lives could be, much like opulent reality TV in that way.

I vividly remember someone in the year lower than mine, who came out as bi. But they struggled: they came from the more deprived side of town, and was being ostracised by their previous friends.

You can tell from a glance at their face the situation wasn't ideal. What is Pride if your college on one hand offers rainbow flags and 'Pride Clubs' while it's senior leadership mocks the 'rainbow alliance' students.

What is Pride when gay white men take to Facebook to condemn their favourite gay bar for saying police brutality is bad? This isn't a universal experience, what even is a universal experience really. For instance, I can only listen to and learn from the experiences of those who are people of colour to understand their experience and understanding of this more thoroughly. Yet there is a shared oppression here.

The problem with Pride, and queer culture, at times is that it becomes gestures. Gestures don't save kids, or fix healthcare, or stop hate crimes.

Actions do. Actions towards liberation in the face of actions towards fascism. We, the LGBTIQA+ Community and allies, sometimes take an easy, dissonant approach: we retweet as individuals Pink News threads mocking Tories for using pronouns while ignoring the fact these people are normalising the idea to the public that trans people are a cultural craze that needs to be eradicated.

We post Simpsons memes of Florida being a monster while the state prepares to subtly exterminate it's LGBTIQA+ population as silence from the press prevails. We applaud the BBC for having a drag act at the Eurovision semi-finals while the organisation both sides fascist protesters at Drag Queen Story Time and interviews an anti-trans conspiracy theorist on a 'fact checking' programme.

We therefore have a gesture based politics that can not achieve liberation. There is a trend of people who say they want to fix things, but in the end, what do they do? Little, aside gaining clout. These people in many ways undermine liberation by making it a fashion. Often they are white, like me, and will have the least to lose if we lose as a collective struggle.

Can a Pride based on selling Pride edition Coca Cola bottles achieve political liberation? I hope you the reader feel insulted by the suggestion it can in the question. What is the point of a brand like Target in the United States endorsing Pride up until the point it received backlash? They were never true allies, and neither has the allyship of corporations done much to prevent repressive laws against our community emerge. Disney Land Florida's Pride has not hindered a potential future US president, Governor DeSantis.

 

Yet, there are consistent flashes of hope. The rise of community organising is necessary and positive, especially in regards to housing and medical access. The rise in Prides like Black Pride and Trans Pride in recent years is warming to see: to see people who either are invisible or ridiculed in the press to have a built from the ground up Pride is something for us all to be proud of- because that’s how Pride back in 1972 first came about. It is in community, at it’s heart, where we can find Pride.

It is also in the cultures we make ourselves- underground dance floors without corporate sponsorships, vape-like smoke blown in your face from the ceiling and knowing everyone around you isn't judging you for being you (hideous outfit aside), In that, then, is part, though not the only (how could it be) example of the joyous culture where there is discovery and affirmation.

There can be joy and pride, but that doesn't have to be at corporate mega events. It's at local community supported events. Attacking corporate Pride isn't new, but never has the situation it exists in so dire. We know acceptance, as that's what corporate Pride is, comes and goes. 

A true part of Pride is the aim of liberation and celebration. The recent protests against a speaker who expresses transphobic messages in Oxford, joined by Green councillors too, are an expression and action of a whole community that is fighting for its existence threatened by the legitimisation of an idea that requires for its success the depersonalisation and reducing of trans people, and is part of a wider ideology that seeks to push all LGBT+ people into suppression, like in Florida, even like in Uganda.

The last two places mentioned are not ‘a warning from history’- they are happening now and the politics, animated by its structural existence and supporters, that it derives from -in the shape of Christian Fundamentalism and renewed insidious Colonialism- Capitalism, is pushing for this now in our country today through are media and through the two biggest political parties.

 

For Pride, let's have it on our community's terms, and have pride in our ability to and aim to liberate our societies, and be able to within that celebrate something authentic.

Because that is what Pride really, truly is without a corporate sponsorship.

By Seb Cousins 

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Interview with Amita Kuttner, by Joshua Harris https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/2023/05/30/interview-with-amita-kuttner-by-joshua-harris/ Tue, 30 May 2023 17:46:09 +0000 https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/?p=3250 Joshua: Thank you so much for joining us today, Amita. I’ll start by just giving you a chance to introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about your work.   Amita: So, my name is Amita Kuttner, and I am the former interim leader of the Green party of Canada. I’m also the first [...]

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Amita Kuttner

Joshua:

Thank you so much for joining us today, Amita. I’ll start by just giving you a chance to introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about your work.

 

Amita:

So, my name is Amita Kuttner, and I am the former interim leader of the Green party of Canada. I’m also the first trans and non-binary person to lead a federal party in Canada and I’m also queer.

My background is originally in astrophysics, and I have a PhD in astrophysics. I’ve also done some non- profit work around tech policy.

 

Joshua:

Thank you! I’m going to start by asking and do forgive me for anything I get wrong about Canadian politics, but from what I understand you were the leader of the Canadian Greens for a year. And as you say you were the first trans and non-binary person to lead a political party in Canada.

I saw an interview you did were you spoke about rebuilding the party. Could you speak about your experience as leader and a trans person in leadership?

 

Amita:

Yeah, I think it was interesting just leading the party during the time I was as it had gone through turmoil, public drama and scandal so it was a time for rebuilding, I don’t know if identity comes much into that process its more about the regular work of any leader trying to restabilize a party and the limits of the role of the leader anyway.

But certainly, being the first trans person and just kind of being out in a time of rising hatred with transphobia was very interesting because I had that responsibility to represent the community and do as much as I can to make sure that people understand the relationship between climate policy and social policy, and climate justice and the importance that we’re fighting for everyone’s rights.

These are not separate problems; they have the same core causes within our societal structures. You know there’s always that issue. So, I always wanted to make sure I wasn’t talking to much about trans stuff, but also making sure I was addressing it.

 

Joshua:

Absolutely and not the easiest balance I imagine, again correct me if I’m wrong but the Canadian parliament voted to ban conversion therapy during your time as leader. Is that correct?

 

Amita:

It is!

 

Josh:

I’m glad I got that correct then, can you tell us what that time was like?

 

Amita:

What happened was the previous parliament brought it forward and then the parliamentary session ended when a snap election was called so it was one of the bills people were frustrated didn’t make it. Because it’s been in like the promise book of our governing parties for a little while now.

So, it was unanimously passed in the house and then sent to the senate where it was also unanimously passed and then got royal assent and is now law. It was very interesting because it took some, I don’t know what the word is here, maybe finagling, of the Conservative leadership, to get it through unanimously which then resulted in the Conservative leader being ousted.

So, it was actually rather dramatic and a beautiful show of solidarity and progressive values for the entire country but wasn’t necessarily what the entire country was thinking. Leading up to that there was a lot of work from all the progressive parties and many civil groups pushing for it and petitions.

But there was also a huge fight over the inclusion of gender identity or the method of inclusion of gender identity within a conversion therapy ban and since then there’s been discussions. Like many things within Canadian law there’s a lot of protections that are offered, but very little actual support offered to say eliminate the practice of conversion therapy or support survivors, or make sure any thing’s actually changing.

So that’s kind of the next steps where we are, but it’s certainly a good step taken.

 

 

Joshua:

Interesting I mean the UK is somewhat at a comparable stage. In the UK, in that there were discussions and pushes for this when both Theresa May and Boris Johnson were Prime Minister, and it’s been continuously delayed since. Again, there have also been a lot of debates around the inclusion of gender identity within the ban.

Where we now are, is the government arguing they can’t give us a date where we can expect to see legislation because they want to ensure protection is proper and robust. I think for many we would hope after six years we’d be a little further along. What advice would you have for activists and Greens here who are frustrated by the waiting game?

 

Amita:

Yeah, I would speak primarily to my frustrations leading up to us having success in it, countering misinformation that was coming up. As to me that was the biggest reason it was being questioned, especially why you would not have gender identity included, in our case it was not that they didn’t want gender identity included entirely.

I think you’re dealing with more extreme pushback than we did but certainly we’re up against those arguments. It was really tiring to get people who were sceptical to understand that banning conversion therapy was not going to suddenly convince people into being trans or queer. And you’re making sure that no one could be convinced of something they aren’t, and I don’t think you’re ever going to find a trans person who believes anybody should be convinced of something they aren’t because that’s the horrible thing to deal with.

The idea of making a cis person believe they’re something they are not is just as terrifying. And I think that’s one of the biggest things, having that conversation before you’re too far down the road of division and misinformation. But I am kind of sorry because I think that’s its pretty clear that in the UK there’s a lot of transphobic sentiment that is intense enough to be overflowing the borders and making it across the ocean to the extent that I’ve gotten it from the UK online about me.

So, it’s I think really holding the line and saying this is actually the reasonable approach, no one is suggesting anything unreasonable, we’re trying to create the freedom for everyone to be themselves and to not in fact be convinced to be something there not.

I think that there’s always parallels to gay rights, looking at ideas like “it’s all a choice” and all those ideas, and this is currently what’s surfacing with trans people and gender identity. People are saying all sorts of completely, in my opinion, whacky things that don’t make any sense as they don’t come from a place of understanding.

My advice is to really get out there and continue having the conversation and push in every way possible, because certainly every single sitting MP is bombarded with information and the louder and more consistent we can be with giving them a simple positive message the better, as they’re also going to be bombarded with fearmongering and a whole lot of information.

Therefore, the louder you can get and the more people that can get involved the better! And I don’t like this part of it - I think everyone should be able to express themselves with all of their extreme sentiment of emotion, and when it comes to demonstrating I think that’s very, very important.

But, getting people who aren’t from any sort of community related to queer and trans things to also see how important it is and show up as allies, so they see it’s not just an issue that affects this minoritized group, everyone cares about this. It’s about fundamental human rights.

Then you show that it’s just something that needs to be dealt with and I think this is what happened in Canada, this actually worked with enough people in the Conservative party that it became undeniable to the leadership of the Party at the time that it was something they could support easily, and it could work.

Which ended up being a mess for them politically but was the right thing to do and we’ve watched kind of the split within the Conservative party because the previous leader had trans advisors and there was a whole “this is not a left/ right issue”, “this is not a partisan issue” and “this is just about people so it shouldn’t be a problem at all”.

And then since then with the rise in transphobia, there’s been people wondering which political party are they welcome in if their rights are going to be a political point so I think the volume and reason with which the message can be brought to every single MP.

 

Joshua:

Totally! I think it’s so important as a community and allies that we remain steadfast.

 

Amita:

Yeah don’t give up. I think in the end justice prevails.

 

Joshua:

I think we have a pretty terrible situation in the UK and I’m very sorry to hear you’ve been on the receiving end of transphobia from British people.

Something else you mentioned there was misinformation, which is obviously a huge problem and the rhetoric that fuels and promotes, leading to this idea of debates we needn’t have. We know gender identity needs to be included in any conversion therapy ban and the relevance of misinformation and peddling of lies that fuels transphobia makes it a lot harder to hold the line.

I guess I’m curious to ask about we tackle this information and challenge these transphobic falsehoods.

 

Amita:

Well, I think there’s an interesting kind of dilemma you end up in, part of what it takes to change things is representation and people being seen and understood.

But when you’re facing this much hate it’s a huge thing to ask of any trans person or any community in general to show up in the face of violence and it’s tiring. You basically need people to be supported and rotated through the very difficult work and it can’t be something people are alone in doing, and it comes down to solidarity building to maintain the energy to get through it.

Because it does wear you down, it’s one of those things that is so hard to describe. You can care about anything but no matter how much in the political world we can get used to people saying horrible things about you, and it doesn’t matter, you don’t take it seriously, it’s a reflection of them and not you- it’s still tiring, you can’t do that forever, just listening to people say horrible and untrue things about you all the time.

Certainly, I think as much as allies can share and help and support trans people to share their stories and who they are. So people can see all the fearmongering is completely unfounded, because I think at some point fearmongering and fear collapses. You can only wind so much up into something ridiculous before it collapses in on itself because people realise it has no basis in reality.

But that only happens when people have the space to share their true selves without hurt in the process so it’s a little bit of a chicken and egg situation, certainly for trans people wanting to protect themselves versus being an activist.

 

Joshua:

Absolutely, I mean we’re hoping to launch a letter writing campaign to MP’s becauseas you say it’s key to make our voices heard and hopefully something for LGBTIQA+ Greens and other Green members and supports to do, and I think this will help challenge this media narrative we have which is a big part of the problem in the UK, these constant articles talking about the same things and peddling the same lies but still making a lot of noise.

 

Amita:

Yeah, that’s very clear.

 

Joshua:

And I suppose that’s why challenging it with consistency and clarity is key, hopefully really challenge this lopsided narrative.

 

Amita:

Totally. I think a letter writing campaign is a great idea and a wonderful way to go about it. I would add community and solidarity building is also important, and the most powerful tool is always storytelling so, along with a very reasoned letter writing campaign. I think what gets MPs to listen is always heart.

When they can hear and connect to a story of one individual because of how human they are makes a huge difference, and same if you can get a proper meeting with an MP, and lobby, which is ridiculous, but clearly with the media narrative against you and a whole bunch of far-right organising against you, and not entirely in your own country, means you need to organise in that way.

 

Joshua:

Very true! In terms of organising, something I noticed was British Columbian Greens tabled a motion in the provincial house on banning conversion therapy and it reminded me of the Scottish Greens.

In Scotland the Green party are in government and passed a gender recognition reform bill with the Scottish national party. This got an insane amount of pushback sadly.

 

Amita:

Yeah, I followed the whole story actually.

 

Joshua:

Wonderful, well you may have seen then well something that’s been good is they’ve continued to support it and the Greens said during the recent SNP leadership contest it was a redline.

They wouldn’t work in government if the bill was abandoned. It was really clear the Scottish Greens and its membership was clear in solidarity and organising for that.

I wondered with organising, what the situation was when you were leader of the Canadian Greens, especially with regards to conversion therapy?

 

Amita:

Yeah, one big difference is we don’t have as much strength at the local level because of the lack of political parties at the municipal level but we do have very strong provincial parties and they’re separate from the federal party.

And there was a huge push in British Columbia to ban conversion therapy at the provincial level and it was interesting as they were in a confidence and supply agreement for a while, and then the governing party who are the equivalent of the Labour Party pretty much pulled out of that once the Greens previous leader stepped down.

Their response while they had a majority was basically like; “no, it’s something for the federal government” which is frankly ridiculous because for something like conversion therapy you should be banning it at every possible level and every possible way to create the most robust protections and there’s no reason to wait for the federal government.

The provincial Greens did do a lot of work to raise the issue to be part of the conversation and to really push on it. They did a lot of public communications and pushes in multiple ways which helped keep the pressure on the national conversation. Federal Green MPs also spoke about it in the house and advocated behind the scenes, so I think every piece makes a difference.

What gives me hope with the UK is when you look at public surveys there’s not a huge amount of opposition, it’s really in tabloids. I was watching how brutal the conversation was with Scotland, it’s difficult and disturbing as a trans person when you know this is going on.

But if you realise that narrative isn’t a reflection of who people are and what people want, and no one needs this to be the conversation. If there’s a way to call out it out, for what it is, and that’s the UK government deciding they need a scapegoat and a social scare conversation to have.

They’ve picked trans people to distract from complete economic failings and Brexit, you see no one wants this conversation as it shouldn’t be a contentious issue, the people whose bodies it’s fought over it’s tough for them but for everyone else it doesn’t really affect them.

So, it just shouldn’t be such a big conversation and I think that’s an angle that can be taken, it’s unfortunate when anyone is used as a political object.

 

Joshua:

That’s such an important thing to remember. I think back to summer of last year when conversion therapy was really in the headlines in the UK, there was pushback and frustration from the public that the government wouldn’t have a trans inclusive ban and it wasn’t popular to exclude trans people leading to a series of U-turns.

So now where we are is if and potentially when the bill arrives it may be trans inclusive, but like you see it was clear where the public was and were the government and their far-right associates were, were very clearly different places.

They’re just very, very loud.

 

Amita:

Yeah, which often puts the government in the position of retreating on it until they can try to convince people of their position which is the fearmongering.

 

Joshua:

Yep, so now we see the deputy chair of the Conservative party declaring the next general election will be fought on culture wars and trans rights, so they can ignore other issues people are affected by, like the cost of living, the state of public services and the climate crisis. People aren’t hurt by trans people having rights or a conversion therapy ban.

 

Amita:

Absolutely that, it sounds ridiculous when you say it out loud, every day people are impacted by all these issues but oh look at this.

I think what happens when it continues is what we see in the US, we see what happens when trans people are bullied and scapegoated for problems that are economic and otherwise.

Of course, they’re very different and down a different path but it’s clear it has happened and how it built up over time so I think that’s what makes people afraid - the fact you can experience violence in your day to day life as people now interpret you as the enemy and that is somehow so easy to construct, that’s what scares me about the blatant willingness to wage culture wars and to choose people to demonise.

 

Joshua:

Once again I completely agree and to just pick up on that point, when I was doing research for this conversation, I saw on your twitter profile, and I took a quote away form when you congratulated Elizabeth May on winning the Canadian Greens election contest.

You said, “No other party is capable of upending the status quo, to be there effectively we must be strong, self-consistent and unified.”

I do recognise Canadian Greens are separate, but I’m interpreting ‘party’ there to mean the global green movement and I want to pick up on that about how we can be strong and unified, in the face of culture wars, especially with the attacks on trans people and the broader LGBTIQA+ community?

 

Amita:

Yeah, firstly that’s a fantastic question, and I think there’s a great opportunity for a global movement but it’s going to take us examining our values more deeply.

One of the things we’ve come up against in the Canadian Green Party is this idea of diversity and respect for diversity. Often it comes down to diversity of opinion as well and so we must actually face these issues of defining what opinion.

If you’re to have able to have any opinion, which can include a whole bunch of hateful things, which brings rise to inconsistencies with our own values and to me it goes a lot deeper.

And I mean this to all the greens because we do have these threads and these values that connect us at a much deeper level, and it’s more innate than policy. It has to do with how we envision living on the planet and the wholeness of the planet and all the people on it.

So, anything that doesn’t lead to understanding with our fellow people or leads to us supporting violence and allowing us to be held by fear is actually, I wouldn’t say breaking our values as I don’t think people can be blamed for these feelings, but means we haven’t spent the time of introspection into what it is we hold true and represent as a political movement.

I don’t want the conversation to be trans people that makes it happen, but every conversation that comes down to injustice is always a part of a thread that goes much deeper and is actually pulling and unravelling something that has to be unravelled.

Were we not having these arguments of, we can’t talk about that because it’s not climate, and there’s a difference of opinion on this, when really we’ve come under the influence of people who are fearmongering, and not from that place of community which is what we’re looking for and a way of life that is sustainable for generations where we all have access to human rights.

And the reason I really think it is that is people fight against trans rights and misunderstandings of gender identity come from the scarcity mindset, that people have to be in opposition to each other in the way we live and we know as greens that isn’t true.

So, I think that’s why it’s such an issue. The people who feel there’s a problem with trans people, there’s a fear there that we have to address.

 

Joshua:

That’s really inspiring thank you. I think that’s a really key point. The last thing I wanted to ask as your time as leader and wanting to heal those internal divisions, you even spoke there a bit about that debate, and we certainly have a similar one- we should only tackle climate issues and the idea of respecting all views when in fact hateful views shouldn’t be.

What wisdom do you have on healing those divisions and pushing for that progressive understanding without climate justice is economic justice is social and racial justice, and how we reflect that in our work?

 

Amita:

I think it comes down to a few things. First people need to be heard and understood in the struggles they’re facing and the fears they have that are surfacing.

Because every time someone says only the climate what they’re actually saying is “I’m terrified for myself and my family, I can’t focus on anything else when I have that fear”, and the way around that is to address the fear and build community on what is possible with climate justice. Give people that sense of rest, and comfort and safety they need.

The other piece is certainly that building that understanding and people having that opportunity without putting anyone else at risk, we should know the causes of the climate crisis are the same causes of other problems; economic, social, you know everything I won’t list every policy, but they all have the same causes with our societal structures we’ve created on this planet being about extraction, scarcity and dominion.

If we can get out of that then suddenly those silos disappear, and we understand it’s all connected. Instead, you see every policy as an opportunity to be climate policy, including trans rights and healthcare.

Then everyone’s happy, it’s just not that easy to get there! Just two thoughts on the conversation on conversion therapy I want to give. One is the religious aspect as it can often be seen as interpreted as hating on the church for the practice, but that isn’t right.

Some churches think that empowering and supporting trans kids is important. I think there’s a bit of digging in the history of the Church, but banning conversion therapy isn’t a threat to the church at all.

The other question is consent, and consenting to torture, which you can’t do, and just the idea of seeing those arguments on the surface. This is a violent person, they’re a danger to women.

And it’s like if someone is a threat to women, their sexual orientation and their gender identity are irrelevant to that.

The problem is deeper, so where others put gender and sexuality as central in the conversation, I think as Greens we have the option to dig deeper, so when people have this non-meaningful argument, we can go deeper and look at the real causes and if the answer is patriarchal violence, I think we all agree.

 

Joshua:

Absolutely and thanks so much for giving up time to chat and discuss this ahead of our letter writing campaign, your insight is fascinating, and it was wonderful to hear from you.

I feel I’m taking a lot away from this conversation and I hope people who are reading this, and part of the campaign do as well. This was a really important conversation and thanks for sharing your experience with us.

 

The post Interview with Amita Kuttner, by Joshua Harris appeared first on LGBTIQA+ Greens.

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In An Ongoing Battle Against Queerphobia and Discrimination in 2023, Let’s Keep Fighting Against Shame. By Matt Rogan. https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/2023/05/17/3241/ Wed, 17 May 2023 19:53:45 +0000 https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/?p=3241 In An Ongoing Battle Against Queerphobia and Discrimination in 2023, Let’s Keep Fighting Against Shame by Matt Rogan Content warning: discusses homophobia, biphobia, transphobia, with references to queerphobic rhetoric. Newspaper article headline "I'd shoot my son if he had AIDS, says vicar" Back in 2021, I read Straight Jacket by Matthew Todd ahead of hosting [...]

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In An Ongoing Battle Against Queerphobia and Discrimination in 2023, Let’s Keep Fighting Against Shame

by Matt Rogan

Content warning: discusses homophobia, biphobia, transphobia, with references to queerphobic rhetoric.

Newspaper article headline "I'd shoot my son if he had AIDS, says vicar"
Newspaper article headline "I'd shoot my son if he had AIDS, says vicar"

Back in 2021, I read Straight Jacket by Matthew Todd ahead of hosting him at an event I organised for my student union’s LGBTQ+ Network. It was February so the talk was related to LGBTQ+ History Month, and specifically focused on mental health within the queer community. After I read the book, I had a chat with Matthew Todd (who speaks as brilliantly as he writes!) and he asked me: “could you see yourself when reading it?”. I answered yes, because when reading I came to share in the knowledge that the queer experience is almost universal and characterised by two things: shame and homophobia. The book itself focused on, as its subtitle suggests, “society’s legacy of gay shame”, however I also came to realise that surrounding this shame comes discrimination. 

 

So, on days such as International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, and Transphobia (IDAHOBIT), it’s imperative we focus on how as queer people we still face an uphill struggle against this hate and shame.

 

Fighting shame and discrimination imposed upon our community is, unfortunately, an ongoing battle we must face. Back in the 1980s, headlines from the media shamed queer people for the smallest of things. One example that sticks in the mind is an article written by none other than Piers Morgan about EastEnders. In the episode, a gay couple shared an intimate moment where they kissed. The response? An article from Morgan calling for Eastenders to be scrapped.

An article by Piers Morgan calling for Eastenders to be scrapped, headline "Scrap EastBenders"

 

Unfortunately, this sort of shame and demonisation wasn’t an isolated incident. The media was fuelled with hateful headlines attacking our community; at the height of the HIV/AIDS epidemic this was more than enough ammunition for the papers.

Collage of homophobic newspaper articles and headlines...

So in 2023, days such as IDAHOBIT are opportunities to look to the past and consider how far we’ve come from the days of homophobic headlines, and epidemics being used to demonise and attack our community. However, do I think we’re past everything we focus on for IDAHOBIT? Absolutely not.

 

It’s a stain on the reputation of the UK that we’ve fallen to being the 17th most friendly LGBTQ+ nation in Europe; in 2015 we were ranked number one[1]. This is undoubtedly due to the fact that history is eerily repeating itself. Nowadays, the same sort of rhetoric used from the 1980s to shame gays and lesbians is being used to damn and spread fear around trans people - this is evident from articles in our media such as ‘Transgender athletes in women's sport are shameless cheats’, posted just 2 weeks ago from the Telegraph[2], and The Sun’s front pages shaming trans people for getting married[3]

 

But what of homophobia in 2023, around the world? We still have a mountain to climb: France has seen homophobic attacks rise by 30% in the last year[4]; Uganda have recently passed a bill criminalising free speech on homosexuality[5]; and here in the UK our police service has been deemed “institutionally homophobic”[6]

 

This isn’t good enough.

 

So whilst on IDAHOBIT we reflect on the progress we’ve made towards queerphobia being a thing of the past, we must also acknowledge that the experience of queerphobia still remains in our society. Reflecting on the message of Matthew Todd’s Straight Jacket, we still feel the shame and discrimination that is forced upon us as a community - don’t forget, there is no LGB without the T and our struggles are intersectional! 

 

In just under a month, it’ll be Pride Month - a month where, as the name would suggest, we take pride in who we are and celebrate diversity. In June, let’s take pride in ourselves; on IDAHOBIT, let’s keep working towards tackling the shame that dampens that Pride.

[1] UK was once ranked the most LGBTQ-friendly nation in Europe. This year, it’s not even close, Pink News - https://www.thepinknews.com/2023/05/11/uk-lgbtq-rights-ilga-europe-rankings-rainbow-map-tories/ 

 

[2] Transgender athletes in women’s sport are shameless cheats, The Telegraph - https://www.telegraph.co.uk/columnists/2023/05/02/austin-killips-trans-cyclist-womens-sport-lia-thomas/

 

[3] The Sun called out over “sensationalist and offensive” front page about trans wedding, Gay Times

https://www.gaytimes.co.uk/life/the-sun-called-out-for-their-sensationalist-and-offensive-front-page-about-trans-wedding/

 

[4] Homophobic attacks in France rose almost 30 percent last year, LGBTQ group says, France 24 - https://www.france24.com/en/europe/20230516-homophobic-attacks-in-france-rose-almost-30-percent-last-year-lgbtq-group-says

 

[5] Uganda’s parliament passes mostly unchanged anti-LGBTQ bill, The Guardian - https://www.theguardian.com/world/2023/may/02/uganda-parliament-passes-anti-lgbtq-bill

 

[6] Met police found to be institutionally racist, misogynistic and homophobic, The Guardian - https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2023/mar/21/metropolitan-police-institutionally-racist-misogynistic-homophobic-louise-casey-report

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Why Lesbian Visibility Week is Important https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/2023/04/26/why-lesbian-visibility-week-is-important/ Wed, 26 Apr 2023 17:30:45 +0000 https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/?p=3218 by Lu Thornton Shibden Hall in Yorkshire, where Anne Lister lived. “I love and only love the fairer sex and thus beloved by them in turn, my heart revolts from any love but theirs." — Anne Lister, Monday 29 January 1821 [Halifax] To begin with, I picked the quotation above because my Nana used to [...]

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by Lu Thornton

Shibden Hall in Yorkshire, where Anne Lister lived.
Shibden Hall in Yorkshire, where Anne Lister lived.

“I love and only love the fairer sex and thus beloved by them in turn, my heart revolts from any love but theirs."

Anne Lister, Monday 29 January 1821 [Halifax]

To begin with, I picked the quotation above because my Nana used to volunteer at Shibden Hall and Anne Lister was the first lesbian I became aware of and the first time I actually began to consider what my sexuality meant to me and the outside world. As a result, Lesbian Visibility Week is crucial because it allows lesbian voices to be heard and their experiences to be recognised. Lesbians have been marginalised and silenced for many years, and their tales have frequently been erased from history. Take, for example, Anne Lister, whose diaries were kept until 1982, when Halifax-born historian Helena Whitbread uncovered them and spent six years deciphering Anne's code. Lesbian Visibility Week reminds us that lesbian women are a vital part of our society, and their voices and experiences are worthy of recognition. The annual week-long celebration, which runs from April 24 to April 30th, is an opportunity to highlight the obstacles that lesbians confront and raise awareness about issues that impact them.

 

As a Green Party member and one of the Young Greens' Events Officers, I understand how critical it is for progressive action to take place so that Lesbians like myself can live more comfortably in society. Lesbian Visibility Week raises awareness about the difficulties that lesbians experience. Lesbian women are frequently subjected to discrimination and prejudice in society. Because of their sexual orientation, many lesbians face barriers to healthcare, housing, and work. Lesbian Visibility Week contributes to a more open and welcoming society by highlighting these problems.

 

Another significant component of Lesbian Visibility Week, which I discovered at a young age, is the celebration of lesbian culture and history. Lesbian women have made major contributions to every sector of society, from artists and authors to activists and pioneers. There have been and continue to be many more lesbians throughout history and modern-day society, but their contributions have frequently been forgotten or obliterated. Lesbian Visibility Week allows us to recognise and celebrate these efforts, as well as guarantee that lesbian women are included in our communal history going forward. Among the numerous outstanding Lesbian activists in the Green Party are Lucy Pegg, Lisa Stone, Adi Daly-Gourdialising, and Helen Dixon. 

 

Lesbian Visibility Week is especially important in empowering and supporting lesbian women, which the Green Party and the LGBTIQA+ Greens always push for when advocating LGBTIQA+ rights. Lesbian Visibility Week, on a larger scale than the Green Party, gives a forum for lesbian views to be heard, builds a sense of community, and creates solidarity among the lesbian community. It also encourages lesbian women to be proud of their identities and to celebrate the diversity within the lesbian community.

 

Finally, as we fight for equality and justice for everyone, it is critical that we recognise the importance of lesbian visibility and continue to celebrate the lives and accomplishments of lesbian women.

 

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LGBTIQA+ Greens Open Letter to EHRC on ‘Clarifying the definition of ‘sex’ in the Equality Act’. https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/2023/04/15/lgbtiqa-greens-open-letter-to-ehrc-on-clarifying-the-definition-of-sex-in-the-equality-act/ Sat, 15 Apr 2023 17:39:58 +0000 https://lgbtiqa.greenparty.org.uk/?p=3212 LGBTIQA+ Greens call on the Equality and Human Rights Commission to "reverse course and create guidance that protects trans people rather than simply ostracising them" LGBTIQA+ Greens have sent an open letter to the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) outlining their concerns with the recent 'guidance' from the EHRC with the title ‘Clarifying the [...]

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LGBTIQA+ Greens call on the Equality and Human Rights Commission to "reverse course and create guidance that protects trans people rather than simply ostracising them"

LGBTIQA+ Greens have sent an open letter to the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) outlining their concerns with the recent 'guidance' from the EHRC with the title ‘Clarifying the definition of ‘sex’ in the Equality Act’.

In the letter, LGBTIQA+ Greens state "It is extremely disappointing to see an organisation with its remit in Equalities law advocating for the removal of rights for transgender people in this country" and go on to say "This is yet another attempt to de-humanise trans people and we cannot stand for it."

The letter calls on the EHRC to "reverse course and create guidance that protects trans people rather than simply ostracising them."

The LGBTIQA+ Greens committee, Green Party of England & Wales Leadership, key GPEW elected representatives and many other GPEW members have signed the letter.

The full letter is below.

 

Baroness Kishwer Falkner

 

Equality and Human Rights Commission

Third Floor

Windsor House

50 Victoria Street

London

SW1H 0TL

 

Dear Baroness Falkner,

 

We are writing to you as the LGBTIQA+ affiliate of the Green Party of England and Wales in regards to a recent article posted on your behalf with the title ‘Clarifying the definition of ‘sex’ in the Equality Act’. We are deeply concerned that this is fundamentally at odds with the spirit of the Equality Act 2010 as well as the Gender Recognition Act 2004.

 

As you know, this letter advises the government to treat trans men with a GRC as women and trans women with a GRC as men; we believe this advice to be contrary to Section 9, subsection 1 of the Gender Recognition Act 2004. Trans women are women and trans men are men in all cases, but those with a GRC are legally their gender in the eyes of the UK government. It is extremely disappointing to see an organisation with its remit in Equalities law advocating for the removal of rights for transgender people in this country.

 

This latest move also harms the recognition of intersex and non-binary people, who have even less protection in UK law than binary trans people. We believe in the full recognition of non-binary identity and allowing intersex people to be authentically themselves without being forced to pick a gender that doesn’t reflect their reality.

 

Trans people face significant discrimination in their lives, particularly when it comes to dealing with the British state. Trans healthcare is being chipped away at and forcing trans people to go to separate clinics simply slows down the system and prolongs the suffering of many trans people. This is yet another attempt to dehumanise trans people and we cannot stand for it.

 

We sincerely hope you will reverse course and create guidance that protects trans people rather than simply ostracising them.

 

Signed:

 

Cade Hatton

Co-Chair, LGBTIQA+ Greens

Trans Liberation Officer, Young Greens

Conferences Committee Member

 

Dylan Lewis-Creser

Co-Chair, LGBTIQA+ Greens

Equality & Diversity Officer, Young Greens

Green Party candidate for Fulwood Ward, Sheffield

 

Mina Cousins

External Communications and Press Officer, 

LGBTIQA+ Greens

Manchester Green Party

 

Thomas Atkin

International Officer, LGBTIQA+ Greens, Sheffield Green Party Elections Coordinator & Candidate for Graves Park Ward, Sheffield

 

Joshua Harris

Campaigns Officer, LGBTIQA+ Greens

 

Marz King

Membership Secretary, LGBTIQA+ Greens

Membership Secretary, Greens of Colour

BME Officer, Federation of London Green Parties

Membership Secretary, Sutton and Croydon Green Party 

 

Olli Watkins

Co-Secretary, LGBTIQA+ Greens

 

Ria Patel

Liberation Officer, LGBTIQA+ Greens 

Sutton & Croydon Green Party 

Green Party Spokesperson for Equalities & Diversity

Green Party Councillor for Fairfield, Croydon

 

Matt Rogan

Policy Officer, LGBTIQA+ Greens

 

Rob Callender,

Digital Communications Officer, LGBTIQA+ Greens,

Co-Chair Newham Green Party.

 

Supported by:

 

Carla Denyer

Co-leader, Green Party of England and Wales

 

Zack Polanski

Deputy Leader, Green Party of England and Wales

 

Anthony Slaughter

Leader, Wales Green Party

 

Chesca Walton

Co-Chair, Green Party Women

 

Benali Hamdache

Green Party Councillor in Islington

Green Party Spokesperson for refugees and migrants 

 

Catherine Rowett

Spokesperson for work, employment and social security, former MEP,

Norwich Green Party

 

Nate Higgins

Green Party Councillor in Newham

Green Party Spokesperson for Democracy and Citizen Engagement

 

Danny Keeling

Newham Council Leader of the Opposition, Green Party Councillor in Newham

 

Sian Berry

Green member of the London Assembly

 

Caroline Russell

Green member of the London Assembly

 

Rowan McLaughlin

Candidate for Saltburn Ward (Redcar and Cleveland)

Green Party South Tees Coordinator

 

Finn White 

Co-Chair, LGBTIQA+ Young Greens

Under 18s Officer, Young Greens

 

Ash Routh

Candidate for Walkley Ward (Sheffield)

Green Party Regional Council Rep (Yorkshire & Humber)

 

Alexi Dimond 

Green Party Councillor for Gleadless Valley, Sheffield 

 

Ben Foley
Green Party Councillor for Castle Ward, Bedford
Green Party Regional Council Rep (Eastern)

 

Joe Hudson-Small
Green Party Regional Council Rep (London)

 

Adam Turner

Green Party Regional Council Rep (Wales)

 

Scott Ainslie

Co-Leader of Lambeth Green Group of councillors

 

Pete Johnson

Elections Co-ordinator, Lambeth Green Party

 

Phil Davies

Campaigns Officer, Young Greens

Gwent Green Party

 

Chris Jarvis

Leader, Oxford City Council Green Group

 

Emma Edwards
Green Group Leader, Bristol Green Party

 

Rachel Collinson 

Former Business Spokesperson

Disciplinary Committee (London rep)

 

Lee Huntbach

Tameside Green Party, Sole Green Councillor on Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council

 

Claire Carr

Deputy Group Leader of the Green Group on Hastings Borough Council, Hastings Green Party

 

Dan Kittmer

Young Greens Chair, Cambridge Green Party

 

Melanie Earp

Green Party Regional Council Rep (North West)

2021 Candidate for Mayor of Greater Manchester

Trafford Green Party

 

Bex Whyman

Sheffield Green Party

2022 Candidate for Mayor of South Yorkshire, Candidate for Dore & Totley Ward, Sheffield

 

Jenny Vernon

Candidate for Filton Ward (South Gloucestershire)

Elections Coordinator, South Glos Green Party

Disciplinary Committee (Conference)

 

Elaine Francis

Co-Chair, South Tyneside Green Party

 

Cllr David Francis

Green Group Leader, South Tyneside Council

South Tyneside Green Party

 

Isabella Metcalf-Riener

Candidate for University Ward (Lancaster) 

Green Students Committee

 

Cllr Lucy Pegg

Deputy Leader on Oxford City Council Green Group, Young Greens LGBTIQA+ Officer

 

Miranda Heath

Events Officer, Young Greens

 

Benjamin Wold Birmanis

International Officer, Young Greens

 

Elise Benjamin

Comms Officer, Jewish Greens

Green Party International Coordinator

 

Patrick McAllister

Green Party Councillor for Hotwells & Harbourside, Bristol City Council

 

Robin Brabham

Cambridge Green Party

Disciplinary Committee (Conference representative)

 

Darren Yates

Co-ordinator Derbyshire Green Party

Treasurer East Midlands Regional Green Party 

Green Party Regional Council Rep (East Mids)

Candidate for Hasland ward (Chesterfield)

 

Mark Posen

Candidate for Stour Valley North Ward (Braintree)

Witham and Braintree Green Party

 

Catherine Goodman

Green Party Councillor for Church, St Neots

Huntingdonshire Green Party

 

Ben Samuel

Campaigns Committee, Green Party of England and Wales

 

Martin Phipps

Green Party councillor for City ward, Sheffield Council

 

Amanda Jobson 

Green Councillor Hastings Borough Council, Hastings Green Party

 

Vinnie Wainwright

Co-coordinator, Bristol Green Party

Treasurer, South West Green Party

 

Chris Brooks

Co-Chair, Newham Green Party

 

Alex Catt

Green Party councillor for Sewell, Norwich City Council

Co-Chair of Norwich Green Party 

 

Jenny Bartle 

Green Party Councillor for Easton, Bristol City Council

 

Cllr Daniel Laycock

St Neots Town Council & 

Chair - Huntingdonshire Green Party

 

Laura Eccott

Chichester and Arundale Green Party

Non-Portfolio Officer, Green Party Women

 

Rupert George

Policy and Campaigns Officer for the Federation of London Green Parties

 

Ruben Gonzalez

Secretary for the Federation of London Green Parties

 

Adi Daly-Gourdialsing

Diversity Officer Federation of London Green Parties

 

Devon Osborne

Membership Secretary, Green Party Women

 

Alastair Binnie-Lubbock

Green Party Councillor in Hackney

 

Zoë Garbett 

Green Party Councillor in Hackney

 

Nathalie Bienfait 

Green Party Councillor in Tower Hamlets

 

Rachel Rodwell 

Candidate for Allington Ward

Maidstone Green Party

 

Cllr Ani Stafford-Townsend

Bristol Green Party

Green Councillor for Bristol City Council

Former Green Party Women Co-Chair 

 

David Farbey,

Treasurer Barnet Green Party, Treasurer London Green Party,

Non-Portfolio Officer Jewish Greens

 

Paul Burgess

Comms Officer, Tower Hamlets Green Party

 

Edward Saul

Social Media Officer, Cheltenham Green Party 

 

Tabi Joy

Green Party Councillor for St. Paul’s Ward, Cheltenham

 

Charlotte Lafferty

Chair 

Waltham Forest & Redbridge Green Party

 

Lizzie Waight

Social Officer, Tower Hamlets Green Party

 

Florent Zwiers

Co-chair, Tower Hamlets Green Party

 

Malcolm Powell

Coordinator, London Green Party

 

Simon Levey

Events Officer, Tower Hamlets Green Party

 

TJ Milburn

Treasurer and election agent, Exeter Green Party

 

Cllr Matthew Snedker 

Coordinator, Darlington Green Party

 

Cllr Bryony Holroyd

Campaign Manager, Darlington Green Party

 

Mike McTimoney 

Safeguarding Officer, Electoral Officer, Darlington Green Party

 

Jon Barley,

Data Manager, Darlington Green Party

 

Rachael Reid 

Internal Comms, Darlington Green Party

 

Peter Greenwood

External Comms, Dalington Green Party

 

Roz Henderson

Members Secretary, Darlington Green Party

 

Megan Hemsley

Equality Diversity and LGBTQ+ Co-Contact, Young Greens Coordinator, Darlington Green Party.

 

Jane Mitchell

Equality Diversity and LGBTQ+ Co-Contact, Minutes Secretary, New Members Contact, Darlington Green Party. 

Co-ordinator and Mentor for Phoenix Trans Darlington.

 

Anna-Maria Toms

Darlington Green Party

 

Kate Mammolotti

Darlington Green Party

 

Martin Wood 

Darlington Green Party

 

Louise  Maddison 

Darlington Green Party

 

Thomas Robinson

Darlington Green Party

 

Judith Parker

Darlington Green Party

 

Richard Lawless 

Darlington Green Party

 

Stefan Liberadzki

Co-ordinator, Hackney Green Party

 

Jake Welsh

Manchester Green Party

 

Katie Fenn

Sheffield Green Party

 

Peter Brommer
Coventry Green Party

 

Robert Crowston
Cardiff, Vale & RCT Green Party

 

Owain Sutton
Trafford Green Party

 

Rob & Nicole Freeman

Sheffield Green Party

 

Sam Easterby-Smith

Manchester Green Party

 

Kerry Dooley

Green Party South Tees

 

Ben Brown

Sheffield Green Party

 

Glenn Haffenden 

Hastings Green Party 

 

Jay Calderisi

Cardiff, Vale & RCT Green Party

 

Jon Owen

Kendal Green Party

 

Meg Shepherd-Foster

Maidstone Green Party

 

Laura Potter

Manchester Green Party

 

Avery Withers

Sheffield Green Party

 

Logan Robin

Sheffield Green Party

 

Emma Garnett

Oxfordshire Green Party

 

Barry Jobson

South Tees Green Party 

 

Tony Nicholson

Doncaster Green Party

 

Phil Di Palma

Norwich Green Party

 

Matthew Jenkins

Worcester Green Party 

 

Amy Benson
Sheffield Green Party

 

Chris Ogden

Manchester Green Party

 

Rebecca Mulvaney

Sheffield Green Party

 

Louis Stephen

Worcester Green Party

 

Fiona Aviani-Bartram

Sheffield Green Party

 

Robert Gardner

Waltham Forest and Redbridge Green Party

 

Sue Avery

Worcester Green Party

 

Neil O’Doherty

North Somerset Green Party

 

Stephen Brennan

Wakefield Green Party

 

Connie Muir

Sutton & Croydon Green Party

 

Emily Stewart

Mole Valley Green Party

 

Valerie Remy

Southwark Green Party

 

Xingyu Liu

Tower Hamlets Green Party

 

Kirsty Chestnutt

Tower Hamlets Green Party

 

Emma M. Dungey-Betts 

Brighton and Hove Green Party

 

Haris Hussnain 

Gwent Green party 

 

Jack Philipson
Gateshead Green Party

 

Hilary Rosser

Sheffield Green Party

 

Easwar Vivekanandan 

Solihull Green Party

 

Alice Spendley

Hackney Green Party

 

Melissa Poulton

Worcester Green Party

 

Amelia Jones

Lancaster Green Party

 

Grazyna Buczkowska

Manchester Green Party

 

Maria Deery

Lancaster Green Party

 

Simon Stafford-Townsend

Bristol Green Party

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